Brooke Bryand Photography: Family

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Why Custom Photography Costs More {Marketing}

I sometimes hear friends/acquaintances talk about photographers and the high costs associated with hiring someone to "just click a few photos". I came across this article today by Marianne Drenthe of Marmalade Photography and I found myself nodding my head in agreement. I am so grateful to ALL of my fantastic clients, but I do think this helps explain a little more of the "behind the scenes" of what goes into each and every shoot that I do:

Check out full article at ProfessionalChildPhotographer.com

I also really loved this story (excerpt from the same article as is linked above)...so appropriate for a zillion situations in life, including photography:

There is an old story about a ship that cost a company millions of dollars. Something went wrong in the engine room and the ship was stuck in dock. They called various "experts" who spent weeks trying to fix the issue to no avail and at a cost of tens of thousands of dollars. Finally a older gentleman was called in who simply brought in his small tool bag and a hammer. He set about pinging on various parts of the vast engine with his hammer, finally settling on one area. He spent a few minutes pinging in that area, took out a few tools and fixed whatever what was wrong. After a few moments the man straightened up, looked at the captain and instructed him to "start her up." The captain disbelievingly went to get the engines started while the man sat in the engine room listening as the engine roared to life. The man tipped his hat as he exited the ship to the staff who sat dumbfounded because they had seen all the experts come on board for days with their expensive equipment only to have the ship not fixed. This man did it in a few minutes with a few pings of his hammer! A few days passed and the man sent the shipping company a bill for $10,000. The accounting department contacted him immediately. Why all the rumors mentioned that this man had only spent "a few minutes" fixing the ship "with his hammer and a few other random tools". When questioned about why his bill was for $10,000 – did he accidentally leave an extra zero on the bill? The man confidently responded: "In fact the time was worth the $1,000. The other $9,000 was for the years of experience and the ability to discern the issue as quickly as possible for the company."